in washington, d.c., support for american manufacturing jobs is easy to come by. 
it’s action that’s missing.
Join the AAFA in supporting domestic apparel manufacturing jobs by urging the passage of the Department of Defense Textile and Apparel Procurement Act and the Federal Prison Industries Competition in Contracting Act.

 
   
The Reality
Federal Prison Industries (FPI), a government-run program that puts inmates to work while in prison, enjoys an unbridled preference when it comes to unfairly claiming federal contracts to outfit our troops.  As a result, our domestic manufacturers, and the hardworking tax-payers they employ, lose valuable market share – and jobs – to federally-incarcerated inmates
 
   
The Reality
In 2010, the U.S. military spent more than two billion dollars on uniforms, camouflage, training gear, and combat footwear for our troops.  Nearly seven percent of that business went to federal inmates in 24 federal prisons around the country.  Last year, FPI posted a $36 million profit in their apparel and textile business alone.
     
The Reality
FPI’s impact on the U.S. textile and apparel industry has dramatically worsened in recent years.   In the last decade, our industry has watched FPI’s share of the military clothing market grow while the size of the overall military clothing market has declined due to budget constraints and troop drawdowns.   The domestic industry continues to plan for sharp cutbacks, which will increase FPI’s market share even more because FPI is not subject to the same cuts.
     
The Reality
Small apparel and textile manufacturers continue to tell stories of lost contracts to FPI because of FPI’s ability to unilaterally take almost any contract they choose.  These situations have led to layoffs, job losses, and, in some cases, the closure of whole “Made in America” factories.  Moreover, FPI also represents millions of dollars of lost opportunities, as U.S. manufacturers are not even afforded the chance to bid on contracts that could have led to the retention and creation of U.S. jobs.

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